Make use of your knowledge

Superiority and your ego will not get you far, be humble and spread your knowledge.

This was definitely a week of varying emotions. It took me a while to think about what I wanted to write about, and it varied from topics that needed a lot of research and knowledge in order to do it justice. However, I decided that this week I needed to explain something that I believe we constantly overlook.

Last week, I wrote about the importance of keeping yourself informed and constantly using knowledge to better yourself.

Although this is true, it is so important to not be selfish about the knowledge you have.

Look­—what use is the knowledge you have if you never allow those around you to have it? If you’re a specialist in a certain skill, or if you’re working with a team of people who all contain a different skill, and you decide that it’s best to just not help those around you, then you’ve failed to help those around you grow.

You’re going to be given a wealth of knowledge. Your selfishness will not make you a better person.

It’s tough because you may want to spread your knowledge to others because you know it’ll absolutely help those individuals in their lives. But then comes those individuals who will ostracize you for making the decision to spread your knowledge.

People who make you feel bad, or bring you down because of your consistent efforts to inform and teach those around you because they feel that your knowledge is superior to everyone, are people whose opinions you should not be basing your actions on.

I’ve caught myself in fear of even explaining to people or going to people to teach them something new. I’ve found that I continuously keep my mind set on that individual or group of people who ostracize me, to the point where I lose my sense of focus on my ultimate goals. Just this week, I’ve been dealing with this mind battle of wanting to spread knowledge to a group of people, while also considering that I’ll be shunned if I do it. I know that I’m not doing anything wrong, and that the knowledge I have will benefit the people with whom I share it. Despite this, I can’t help but feel guilty, regardless of how good my actions may be.

I get so caught up in the potential of being ostracized that it almost freezes my ability to even make a decision about anything. All because someone decided that the knowledge I have is superior to those around me. It ruins you and makes you feel like trash. It really does.

I have a lot to work on, mentally, when it comes to this topic. It’s definitely a work in progress, but I know that one day I’ll realize that spreading the knowledge I do have, and will have, is probably one of the most important things I can do for myself, and for the people who want to learn and grow.

You cannot let those who believe that they are superior to everyone else be the people that decide your actions. People will never remember the ones who kept their knowledge to themselves. Those that believe they are superior will definitely have people who believe that, and fall for the trap of believing in their constant goal of proving that they are better than everyone. Though, eventually that following will wither away, and that person’s superiority complex will be crushed.

No one is superior to anyone else. The best leaders are those willing to spread their knowledge to those around them.

At the end of the day, what’s the point of living and putting yourself in fear of individuals who want to hide you away and to keep you away from allowing knowledge to spread. If you have a wealth of knowledge, spread it. You’re going to teach someone something that’ll change them, even the slightest bit, and being afraid to spread that is no way to live.

Realistically, no one should care about how you spend your free time and what you do with it. Your life is your life. Your actions will define you­—they will. If you want to spread the wealth of knowledge you carry in order to help progress those around you, then go ahead. Be you and do you.

Which brings me to my next point—our egos. Wonderful little things we have. Our egos constantly define who we are. I’ve written about this before, but I strongly believe that being humble about yourself, your accomplishments, looks, personalities, and whatever else, will set you apart from those that use their egos to boast to the world about who they are and what they’ve done.

Those who aim to bring you down and make attempts to tell you that your knowledge should not be shared, are people who you should not base your actions off of. Spread knowledge, be you, and let your actions define you—not your ego.

 

YOURS,
MAHMOUD SAROUJI