U of T professor wins Bower award and prize


The Franklin Institute has chosen Richard Peltier, a University of Toronto Physics professor, as the recipient of the 2010 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science. Peltier is the first Canadian to receive this $250,000 award. Previous recipients include Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking. Renowned for his research on the interconnections of system climate variability in the hydrosphere and cryosphere and the internal properties of the Earth, Peltier uses mathematical concepts to show the trends of climate change that have occurred throughout the course of the Earths history.

The Franklin Institute was founded in 1824 in Philadelphia to inspire and celebrate the [Benjamin] Franklins of today. Seeking to inspire generations of students to pursue studies in science and technology, the Institute presents the Bower Award to individuals who have made great scientific advances and directed their efforts towards the benefit of humanity.

The physical state of our planet may well be the most important question facing us today. Professor Peltier is one of the scientific leaders who is helping the global society understand the challenges and opportunities we face in saving our fragile Earth. His innovative research continues to be vital to a host of possible solutions, said Professor Paul Young.

Peltier has been part of the U of T community for a long time. He completed his Ph.D in Physics at the University of Toronto in 1971 and went on to teach at U of T in 1993.

In April 2010, Peltier, along with the rest of this years Laureates, will conduct seminars and lectures at universities and participate in various educational programs at the Franklin Institute. Most events are free and open to students of all ages, giving young minds the opportunity to meet and converse with the worlds great modern scientists. Peltier will receive his award at the Franklin Awards Ceremony and Dinner on April 29, 2010.