Health Science Complex gets donation


Terrence Donnelly, a philanthropist and retired lawyer, donated $12 million to UTM’s new Health Sciences Complex, which is expected to open in August. This is the largest donation ever made to the campus.

“This is the first opportunity I’ve had to do something for education,” said Donnelly in an interview with The Mississauga News. “Many of these students have the ability to be doctors, but need a little help.”

The facility will now be named The Terrence Donnelly Health Sciences Complex and will educate 54 students, reaching an enrollment of 216 by the year 2014.

As part of a campaign to increase the number of highly trained physicians in the province, Donnelly donated the money from The Terrence Donnelly Foundation. Of the donation, $10 million will go toward the building of the $37-million, four-storey complex. The other $2 million will be used for scholarships and bursaries for students.

“Terrence Donnelly’s generosity and vision will make a difference to communities across Ontario,” said U of T’s president, David Naylor, in a press release to the university. “We are deeply indebted to him for his remarkable leadership, and his commitment to improving access to top-flight medical education and to high-quality health care.”

The Terrence Donnelly Health Sciences Complex will house the Mississauga Academy of Medicine, the graduate biomedical communications program, research laboratories, classrooms and offices.

The Academy of Medicine is in partnership with the U of T Faculty of Medicine, UTM, Trillium Health Centre, and Credit Valley Hospital.

“Mr. Donnelly’s gift will have a far-reaching impact on this campus,” said Deep Saini, UTM’s principal and vice-president of U of T in a press release. “Thanks to his donation, new opportunities for collaboration will open up, not just in medicine but also in the life and social sciences. His gift has provided the template for growth at U of T Mississauga.”

The facility will allow researchers and scientists to work side by side with faculty members.

“Mr. Donnelly’s gift will make a difference in the lives of this community for many generations to come,” said Dr. Catharine Whiteside, dean of the Faculty of Medicine, in a press release. “The majority of physicians who will train at the Mississauga Academy will likely practise in close proximity, contribute significantly to their community, and enrich the health science network in Mississauga. We are truly fortunate to have such a wonderful and supportive friend.”

In a press release to the university, Donnelly said, “I am honoured and humbled that you have named this beautiful new building after me. But the true value in this building is not the bricks and mortar, but the work being done within its walls—the teaching, learning, and research. I am pleased to be able to support U of T’s contributions that will have a direct benefit on the health of all Canadians.”

The academy’s first class will graduate in 2015.