The professional writing and communication program presents their annual book launch of student-written publications on March 30 at Theatre Erindale. But this time around, the event will showcase two sister publications: Mindwaves and Compass.

Each submission varies in the topics and themes considered. Some recurring themes include relationships, life, and struggles. The publications are intended to be for the general public, rather than academics—there are other journals for that.

Mindwaves received about 100 submissions this year, while Compass collected 30 submissions—so I’m not surprised that the editor-in-chief of Mindwaves, Laura Gillis, had six editors to finalize the submissions.

Both publications are non-fiction professional writing and research journals. Mindwaves will be releasing Volume 10, and Compass will release Volume 3.

I could sense the pride and excitement while speaking to the editor-in-chief of Compass, Kristen Loritz.

“The publication is not simply an academic ‘highlight’ of our writers’ experience[s] at UTM. Each piece represents a small victory and a token of six months of hard work. This is the beginning. This is one small success, of many to come, for those that continue to hone their writing and editing skills,” said Loritz.

editors said that they hope each writer continues their writing journey in one way or another and hit many more milestones in their life.

“I can’t wait for our book launch. It is our party and celebration of the work each person put into the publications,” said Gillis.

The book launch itself is free and will offer the publications for sale at $10 each.

“The more you edit, the more you learn about yourself as a writer. I never think, ‘What do I get out of this?’ My true reward is skill development,” said Loritz. “You cannot escape solid writing and communication skills in this life. They are the foundation of almost every stable career path. These skills are assets you cannot buy, cheat or rush. Our editors made the time to develop these skills and put them into play during the editing process. The final work shows for it.”